11. Color opponency - 2011

11. Color opponency - 2011 - ECE 638: Principles of Digital...

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ECE 638: Principles of Digital Color Imaging Systems Lecture 11: Color Opponency
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Basic spatiochromatic model structure Trichromatic Stage Stimulus L M S Opponent Stage Spatial Frequency Filtering Stage O 1 O 2 O 3 O 1 O 2 O 3 ~ ~ ~
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Opponent stage Trichromatic theory provides the basis for understanding whether or not two spectral power distributions will appear the same to an observer when viewed under the same conditions. However, the trichromatic theory will tell us nothing about the appearance of a stimulus. In the early 1900’s, Ewald Hering observed some properties of color appearance - Red and green never occur together – there is no such thing as a reddish green, or a greenish red - If I add a small amount of blue to green, it looks bluish- green. If I add more blue to green, it becomes cyan. - In contrast, if I add red to green, the green becomes less saturated. If I add enough red to green, the color appears gray, blue, or yellow - If I add enough red to green, the color appears red, but never reddish green
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2012 for the course ECE 638 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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11. Color opponency - 2011 - ECE 638: Principles of Digital...

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