The Cause and Effect Diagram

The Cause and Effect Diagram - The Cause and Effect Diagram...

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Unformatted text preview: The Cause and Effect Diagram (a.k.a. Fishbone) By Kerri Simon When utilizing a team approach to problem solving, there are often many opinions as to the problem's root cause. One way to capture these different ideas and stimulate the team's brainstorming on root causes is the cause and effect diagram, commonly called a fishbone. The fishbone will help to visually display the many potential causes for a specific problem or effect. It is particularly useful in a group setting and for situations in which little quantitative data is available for analysis. The fishbone has an ancillary benefit as well. Because people by nature often like to get right to determining what to do about a problem, this can help bring out a more thorough exploration of the issues behind the problem - which will lead to a more robust solution. To construct a fishbone, start with stating the problem in the form of a question, such as 'Why is the help desk's abandon rate so high?' Framing it as a 'why' question will help in brainstorming, as each root desk's abandon rate so high?...
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The Cause and Effect Diagram - The Cause and Effect Diagram...

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