Early Primates

Early Primates - Primate Evolution (65 - 5 mya) Emergence...

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Primate Evolution Primate Evolution (65 - 5 mya) (65 - 5 mya)
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Emergence of Primates First primates Plesiadapiforms or adapids and omomyids? Environment - Cretaceous to Palaeocene Success of primates Arboreal theory Visual predation hypothesis (Cartmill 1972, 1992)
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Continents at the end of the Meszoic Here are the placement of the continents at the end of the Cenozoic and beginning of the Mesozoic, about 65 m.y.a.
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Early Cenozoic Primates The earliest primates date to the first part of the Cenozoic (65-54 m.y.a.). The Eocene (54-38 m.y.a.) was the epoch of prosimians with at least 60 different genera in two families. The omomyid family lived in North America, Europe, and Asia and may be ancestral to all anthropoids. The adapid family was ancestral to the lemur-loris line.
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Omomyid An artist’s reconstruction of Shoshonius , a member of the Eocene omomyid family.
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Anthropoids Anthropoids branched off from the prosimians during the
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Simmons during the Spring '06 term at South Carolina.

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Early Primates - Primate Evolution (65 - 5 mya) Emergence...

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