Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry

Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry - Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry...

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Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry 4.1 Euclidean Parallelism, Existence of Rectangles 4.2 Parallelism and Trapezoids: Parallel Projection 4.3 Similar Triangles, Pythagorean Theorem, Trigonometry 4.5 The Circle Theorems Homework 6 1
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4.1 Euclidean Parallelism, Existence of Rectangles We begin with a definition of parallel lines: Two distinct lines L and M are said to be parallel iff they are in the same plane and do not meet. We also need the concept of a transversal. A transversal is a line that intersects two other distinct lines. For example, the third side of a triangle is a transversal. The author has a pictorial glossary for alternate interior angles, corresponding angles, and interior angles on the same side of a transversal. These terms apply to the angles whether or not the lines are parallel. 4.1.1 Parallelism in Absolute Geometry page 212 If two lines in the same plane are cut by a transversal so that a pair of alternate interior angles are congruent, then the lines are parallel. This theorem will be proved BEFORE we accept the axiom of parallel lines. It shows that parallel lines exist in Absolute Geometry. Proof: Let L and M be two lines cut by a transversal T. Let angles 1 and 2 be alternate interior angles. Suppose L and M are not parallel and they intersect at some point R. Then we have a triangle and one of the alternate interior angles is actually an exterior angle of this triangle. Since the other angle is interior, it is actually a remote interior angle and by the Exterior Angle Inequality the exterior angle is strictly larger than the remote interior angle. This contradicts our hypothesis so our supposition is in error and the lines are actually parallel. Axiom P1 Euclidean Parallel Postulate If L is any line and P any point not on L, then there exists in the plane of L and P one and only one line that passes through P and is parallel to L. With the scenario in the axiom, there are three possibilities for parallel lines: none (we’ve seen this with Spherical Geometry) one (this is the familiar Euclidean Geometry situation) many (we’ll see this in Chapter 6 with Hyperbolic Geometry) There are immediate and familiar theorems and corollaries that follow from making this choice. 2
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Theorem 4.1.1 page 214 Example 2 page 216 is the proof of Theorem 4.1.3 Exterior Angle Theorem for Euclidean Geometry. Be sure to read it and enjoy the proof. The corollary to 4.1.3 is one of the most famous theorems in Euclidean Geometry. It states that the sum of the interior angles of a triangle is a constant 180. Example 3 is the proof of yet another handy theorem Theorem 4.1.4 The Midpoint Connector Theorem page 218 and 219 is very well done. Please read the proof carefully. It’s corollary is very handy indeed.
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Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry - Chapter 4 Euclidean Geometry...

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