Sugar plantations

Sugar plantations - September 22, 2011 GEOG 259 SUGAR Trade...

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September 22, 2011 GEOG 259 SUGAR Trade Directions in transatlantic slave trade - Slaves to America (from Africa) - Sugar, tobacco and cotton to Europe (from Americas) - Textiles, rum and manufactured goods to Africa (from Europe) Sugar - Tall perennial grass, genus Saccharum - Grows very quickly - You can have a number of harvests over the year with the appropriate climate and nutrients - Sharp leaves, easily cuts workers because it cuts through skin - Need a machete and full clothes to harvest - Mechanized sugar harvesting results in a bad quality product - Resulted in exploitative colonies, not colonies of settlement (like silver-rich regions in the Andes) - Caribbean and Brazil were mostly exploitative for land and labor (easier to conquer as well) - British, Dutch, French in the Caribbean to harvest coffee, sugar, soybeans, oranges, bananas (all introduced to the New World) - The Spanish created a settlement colony in Havana, Cuba, opposite of what the French, English, and Dutch did - Jamaica for example, was more exploitative, had less heavy settlement, mostly just
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course GEOG 259 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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Sugar plantations - September 22, 2011 GEOG 259 SUGAR Trade...

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