Notes-Becomming Urban 10-25

Notes-Becomming Urban 10-25 - Discussion on the First...

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Discussion on the First Amendment (Finishing) 10/26/2010 1. The phrase “separation of church and state” comes from Thomas Jefferson a. “Letter to Danbury Baptists” (1802) b. Hard to interpret the First Amendment because it is narrowly written very vague Becoming Urban: The Growth of the American City 1. Cotton Kingdom (1860) a. The south is the most commercially oriented region in the nation during this time because almost everything produced in the south is for national/international market b. Socio-economic system in the south does not change does not become industrialized/remains rural b.i. 80% of southerners work the land (1860, same as in 1800) b.ii. Stands still in time during the market revolution c. Within the north, the market revolution drastically changes d. The market revolution closely links the north and the south economically e. Slowly but surely the south becomes urban 2. Rise of Factory Culture a. Samuel Slater’s Mill (Pawtucket, RI) a.i. Spinning Jenny and the “Outwork” system a.i.1. Spun cloth a.ii. Yarn would be spun in factories (spinning Jenny) and then the work would be sent “out” to farm families where weavers would turn the yarn into purchasable cloth a.ii.1. Idea: men remain small, independent farmers while women and children help make money by doing Outwork b. No more outwork Lowell, MA (example) b.i. Invented as a factory town in 1820 b.ii.
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Notes-Becomming Urban 10-25 - Discussion on the First...

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