part2 - PART 2 Organization Of An Operating System CS 503...

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PART 2 Organization Of An Operating System CS 503 - PART 2 1 2010
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Services An OS Supplies Support for concurrent execution Facilities for process synchronization Inter-process communication mechanisms Facilities for message passing and asynchronous events Management of address spaces and virtual memory Protection among users and running applications High-level interface for I/ O devices A file system and file access facilities Network communication CS 503 - PART 2 2 2010
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Operating System From The Inside Well-understood subsystems Many subsystems employ heuristic policies Policies can conflict Heuristics can have corner cases Complexity arises from interactions among subsystems Side-effects can be Unintended Unanticipated CS 503 - PART 2 3 2010
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Building An Operating System The intellectual challenge comes from the “system”, not from individual pieces Structured design is needed It can be difficult to understand the consequences of choices We will use a hierarchical microkernel design to help control complexity CS 503 - PART 2 4 2010
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Major OS Components Process Manager Memory Manager Device Manger Clock (time) Manager File Manager Interprocess Communication Intermachine Communication Accounting CS 503 - PART 2 5 2010
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Multilevel Structure The design paradigm we will use Organizes components Controls interactions among subsystems Allows a system to be understood and built incrementally CS 503 - PART 2 6 2010
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Multilevel Vs. Multilayered Organization Multilayer software Visible to user as well as designer Each layer uses layer directly beneath Involves protection as well as data abstraction Examples * OSI 7-layer model * MULTICS layered security structure Can be inefficient CS 503 - PART 2 7 2010
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Multilevel Vs. Multilayered Organization (continued) Multilevel structure Form of data abstraction Used during system construction
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