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LlosengCh08E2

LlosengCh08E2 - Object-Oriented Software Engineering...

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Unformatted text preview: Object-Oriented Software Engineering Practical Software Development using UML and Java Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 2 8.1 Interaction Diagrams Interaction diagrams are used to model the dynamic aspects of a software system • They help you to visualize how the system runs. • An interaction diagram is often built from a use case and a class diagram. — The objective is to show how a set of objects accomplish the required interactions with an actor. © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 3 Interactions and messages • Interaction diagrams show how a set of actors and objects communicate with each other to perform: — The steps of a use case, or — The steps of some other piece of functionality. • The set of steps, taken together, is called an interaction . • Interaction diagrams can show several different types of communication. — e.g. method calls, messages sent over the network — These are all referred to as messages . © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 4 Elements found in interaction diagrams • Instances of classes — Shown as boxes with the class and object identifier underlined • Actors — Use the stick-person symbol as in use case diagrams • Messages — Shown as arrows from actor to object, or from object to object © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 5 Creating interaction diagrams You should develop a class diagram and a use case model before starting to create an interaction diagram. • There are two kinds of interaction diagrams: — Sequence diagrams — Communication diagrams (not discussed) © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 6 Sequence diagrams – an example © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 7 Sequence diagrams A sequence diagram shows the sequence of messages exchanged by the set of objects performing a certain task • The objects are arranged horizontally across the diagram. • An actor that initiates the interaction is often shown on the left. • The vertical dimension represents time. • A vertical line, called a lifeline , is attached to each object or actor. • A message is represented as an arrow between activation boxes of the sender and receiver. — A message is labelled and can have an argument list and a return value. © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 8 Sequence diagrams – same example, more details © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 9 Sequence diagrams – an example with replicated messages • An iteration over objects is indicated by an asterisk preceding the message name © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 10 Sequence diagrams – an example with object deletion • If an object’s life ends, this is shown with an X at the end of the lifeline © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005 Chapter 8: Modelling Interactions and Behaviour 11 Communication diagrams – an example © Lethbridge/Laganière 2005...
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LlosengCh08E2 - Object-Oriented Software Engineering...

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