IRISH AND DISCRIMINATION

IRISH AND DISCRIMINATION - Running head IRISH AND...

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Running head: IRISH AND DISCRIMINATION 1 THE PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT IS TO BE A TEMPLATE FOR YOUR PAPER. IT HAS ALREADY BEEN SUBMITTED TO A TEACHER FOR GRADING AND WILL SHOW YOU PLAGARIZED IF YOU PASSED THIS AS YOUR OWN. DO NOT TRY AND PASS OFF AS YOUR OWN. Irish and discrimination ETH125
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IRISH AND DISCRIMINATION 2 Irish and discrimination No Irish Need Apply. No Blacks No Dogs No Irish. Needless to Irish Americans were discriminated against. Irish Americans were stereotyped as drunken loud mouths that were dirty and poor, segregated and faced prejudice. The Irish immigrated to the United States because they believed the streets were paved with gold, life would be better than the famine they were facing in the homeland, or they were deported from Ireland because they were criminals. Even though the Irish faced more discrimination in London, they often faced the same discrimination here in the United States. Irish Americans faced forms of discrimination, like redlining, dual labor market, environmental justice issues, institutional discrimination, glass ceiling, and reverse discrimination. The Irish community in America has stuck together to overcome these obstacles to become the well assimilated ethnic group we know today. During the 1800’s the Irish were subjected to the dual labor market. Since they were the
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2012 for the course SCI 241 241 taught by Professor Donna during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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IRISH AND DISCRIMINATION - Running head IRISH AND...

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