Anth V2020. Session 6. Worlding of Late-Imperial China

Anth V2020. Session 6. Worlding of Late-Imperial China -...

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Anth v 2020 : Chinese Strategies Culture in Historical Practice Session  6 : Worlding of Late-Imperial China
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The Great Divide Northern & Southern China From the collapse of the Han in 220 until the reunification of the Sui in 589, China was politically divided into Northern and Southern realms, each with its own empire and capital. Post- Han  Disunity Three-Kingdoms Period  221 – 265 ce
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Post-Han China  China of the Post- Han  Disunity The  Jin  Dynasty  265 – 420 ce
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China of the  Sui  Dynasty 581 – 618 ce Reunified China 
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China of the  Tang  Dynasty 618 – 907 ce Golden Age Renewed
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Under the Tang, China became the preeminent civilization in East Asia and the world with links east to Korea and Japan and west, along the Silk Road. Golden Age Renewed
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The Great Transformation The Economic Cultural Revolution of the Song In the Song, a concert of forces and events conspired, in the Song, to shift the center of gravity of Chinese civilization from north to south. China of the Northern Song  漢漢 960 – 1127 ce
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The more insidious threat, however, was posed by the Jurchens (Nuzhen 漢漢 ), a Tungusic people who inhabited a region that, centuries later, would come to be known as Manchuria, Northeast of China. New Menaces from the  North There, in 1115, the Jurchen established the Jin Dynasty.
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Though not pleased that yet another rival should establish itself on its northern flank, the Song sought opportunity in the situation. In order to take on their common enemy, in 1121, the Song entered into an alliance with the Jurchens, agreeing jointly to invade the Liao. In the battles, however, the Song armies faltered, while the Jurchens succeeded in driving the Liao into Central Asia. New Menaces from the  North
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Emboldened by their victory, in 1125, the Jin broke the alliance with the Song and invaded North China. On 9 January, 1127, Jin forces laid siege to Kaifeng, capital of the Northern Song Dynasty. Both the Qinzong Emperor and his father, the Huizong Emperor, abdicated in panic in the face of Jin forces and were seized. New Menaces from the  North Following the loss of Kaifeng, Song forces continued to fight the Jin for more than a decade, before finally submitting. In 1141, the Song court signed the Treaty of Shaoxing, which formalized the cession of all Song land north of the Huai
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After taking over Northern China, the Jurchen became increasingly Sinicized. About three million people, half of them Jurchens, migrated south into northern China over two decades, and this minority governed some thirty million people. Alienated Center Déjà vu In the 17th century, the descendants of the Jurchen adopted the name Manchu, under which moniker they launched a second, successful campaign of conquest, establishing the Qing (1644- 1910), the last of China’s imperial dynasties.
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China of the  Southern Song  漢漢 1127 – 1279 ce China in Exile
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course ANTH V2020 taught by Professor Hopkins during the Spring '12 term at Columbia.

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Anth V2020. Session 6. Worlding of Late-Imperial China -...

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