{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Why business rules

Why business rules - White Paper Why Business Rules A Case...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Case For Business Consumers of Information Technology Why Business Rules? White Paper
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Why Business Rules? A Case For Business Consumers of Information Technology White Paper © ILOG, March 2006 Do not duplicate without permission. ILOG, CPLEX and their respective logotypes are registered trademarks. All other company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. The material presented in this document is summary in nature, subject to change, not contractual and intended for general information only and does not constitute a representation.
Image of page 2
Table of Contents 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 2 2. Business Policies and Business Rules ................................................................................. 3 3. Benefits of BRMS to Policy Managers .................................................................................. 3 Implementing rule changes according to the business rule life cycle ....................................... 3 Author Rules in Business Language ......................................................................................... 5 Business Action Languages ................................................................................................ 5 Decision Tables and Decision Trees .................................................................................. 6 Manage rules throughout their life cycle, from creation through testing, deployment and retirement ............................................................................................................................ 7 Rule Organization ............................................................................................................... 7 Search 7 Versioning and Auditing ...................................................................................................... 8 Analysis of Rules ................................................................................................................. 8 Testing 8 Simulation ........................................................................................................................... 9 4. What to Look F or in a BRMS ................................................................................................... 9 5. Conclusion ............................................................................................................................... 9 Copyright 2006 ILOG Inc. All rights reserved. Page 1
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. Introduction To the business consumer of information systems, the relationship with the IT personnel who build and maintain those systems can be a paradoxical experience: on the one hand, a partnership with IT delivers significant productivity benefits by automating routine tasks and improving access to information. On the other, the process of building automated systems often requires freezing business policies into software systems, limiting the business sponsor’s flexibility to adapt their operations to dynamic market conditions, individual customer demands, or changing regulatory environments. The relationship between business and IT has often been fraught with misunderstanding, frustration and even hostility. Part of this disconnect between the IT organization and the business groups is a natural disparity between the work cycles of the two groups. To the business, the IT system development cycle appears to be a long, drawn-out process. Further, once the policy managers approve the requirements it is often a leap of faith that the implementation is faithful to those requirements. It is not easy for policy managers to follow their requirements through the implementation process once they are translated into technical forms. In the implementers’ defense, what they receive as requirements is often not sufficiently detailed and precise; many requirements are “refined” in the development process, at best with the concurrence of the business people; at worst, at the discretion of individual programmers. More importantly, though, once the translation is accomplished, the process for changing a business policy requires going through the same complex consultation and translation process for the changes. Thus, the policy changes become entangled with a software development cycle that is driven by a host of technology and resource issues, and is thus insufficiently responsive to the business sponsors’ needs.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern