How_People_think

How_People_think - 1 How People Think Human Information...

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How People Think: Human Information Processing By Bob Bostrom and Vikki Clawson The Model The primary role of a leader or facilitator is helping the group/team achieve its outcomes by making the best possible use of their collective resources. The facilitator accomplishes this by sustaining a process that maximizes collaborations, enhances individual participation, and encourages ownership of or “buy in” to the group outputs. This often requires the facilitator to get the group members to think and respond differently. In terms of human information processing, you might say a facilitator does not just present people with inputs, they actually influence people’s internal computations or the way people think. How do facilitators or leaders influence his or her own or someone else’s thinking? Before this question can be answered, we need a model of how people think. We will use a model of human information processing to explain how to understand and influence your own and others’ thinking processes. We call this the How People Think or Human Information Processing Model. The model is illustrated in Figure 1. We all take in information through our senses (INPUT) and this information is PROCESSED by our brains resulting in behavior (OUTPUT), our response to the situation. We all have the same brain circuits and sensory systems, yet we may respond very differently to same input information. We have all experienced situations where people have very different reactions to same situations. How do we explain these differences? The model indicates this is due to different internal processing. Different processing can result from people accessing different reference experiences from their personal history memory and/or utilizing different processing patterns. How then do leaders or facilitators get someone to look at things differently? Since no one can really change an individual’s personal history, this implies that the facilitator can impact a person’s thinking by influencing his or her internal processing patterns. Our How People Think Model in Figure 1 depicts three major internal processing patterns: framing, emotions, and perceptual positions. These three major patterns are defined next. 1
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2 Figure 1 HOW PEOPLE THINK (Human Information Processing) FRAMING EMOTIONS MEANING INPUTS BEHAVIOR Personal History PROCESSING Criteria Beliefs PERCEPTUAL POSITIONS OUTPUT
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FRAMES: Framing and Reframing Pattern FRAMING refers to how we make meaning out of something . A frame is a mental pattern or template that enables us to make sense of something. We are all familiar with the expression, "frame of reference." If two people have the same mental map or frame of reference, they will more likely put the same meaning on an event or fact, and this similarity will be reflected in their outputs or behavior. But if one person's frame of reference is different, the meaning that person makes will be different, resulting in different behavior.
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