Anderson

Anderson - VIOLENT VIDEO GAME EFFECTS ON CHILDREN AND...

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VIOLENT VIDEO GAME EFFECTS ON CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS Theory, Research, and Public Policy Craig A. Anderson Douglas A. Gentile Katherine E. Buckley O~O~ UNIVERSITY p ILE S S 2007
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Study 1: Experimental Study of Violent Video Games With Elementary School and College Students Study 1 was designed to examine four main qnestions. First, can violent children’s video games increase aggression (relative to a nonviolent chil- dren’s video game) in a short-term experimental context? Second, would such a violent video game effect occur primarily for children or would it also occur for college students? Third, would T-rated violent video games (those rated "T" for teens and older) produce a bigger increase in aggres- sion than the violent children’s games? Fourth, would the short-term ef- fects of playing a violent video game be moderated by sex, prior exposure to violent media, availability of video games in one’s bedroom, preference for violent video games, and parental involvement in media usage? (For a brief description of the current industry-based ratings system and ratings of the games used in Study 1, see Appendix 2.) Inclusion of a trait measure of violence allowed examination of several additional supplementary questions. First, does prior media violence expo- sure predict violence level? Second, how strong is this effect for new media (video games) versus old media (TV, film)? Third, does parental in- volvement moderate tiffs effect? Methods Participants Participants included 9- to 12-year-olds and 17- to 29-year-olds. Younger participants were recruited through ads placed in local newspapers and on university Web pages. Older participants were recruited from the psy- 61
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62 NEW STUDIES chology subject pool at a large Midwestem university. There were 161 younger participants (82 male, 79 female) and 354 older participants (178 male, 176 female). One participant switched video games in midstudy and was subseqnently dropped from the experimental analyses. Each partici- pant completed the study individually. College student participants were given course credit; all others were paid $20 for their participation. Experimental Materials and Measures Video Games Five video games were used in this study: one nonviolent clfildren’s game (Oh No! More Lemmings!, n = 163, 92 old, 71 youug); two violent children’s games (Captain Btnnpet; n = 110, 64 old, 46 young; and Otto Matic, n = 107, 63 old, 44 young); and two violent games rated T, for 13 years and above (Future Cop, It = 67 old only; and Street Fightet; n = 65 old only). For ethical reasons the T-rated games were played only by the older participants. Because the nonviolent children’s game condition was the comparison group for all of the children’s and T-rated violent game conditions, there were more participants hi this group to increase the power of specific comparisons. All video games were played on Macin- tosh iBook laptop computers for 20 minutes. Participants rated the games on several dimensions, including how action packed, entertaining, excit-
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course SOC 1010 taught by Professor Angelikagulbis during the Spring '08 term at Toledo.

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Anderson - VIOLENT VIDEO GAME EFFECTS ON CHILDREN AND...

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