The Great Gatsby - Paul Markakis Period 6 AP English The...

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Paul Markakis AP English Period 6 The Great Gatsby In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, detailed passages were used to connote deeper meanings to the reader. Fitzgerald used figurative language to imply a meaning far beyond that which the passage initially seemed to be about. One such instance of a passage connoting a deeper meaning occurred on page 169. Fitzgerald began by saying that “no telephone message arrived but the butler went without his sleep and waited for it until four o’clock – until long after there was anyone to give it to if it came.” This use of foreshadowing was not clearly explained until the end of the chapter, after it was revealed to the reader that Gatsby had been shot and killed by George Wilson. Four o’clock is also the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange, a direct allusion to the illegal trading Gatsby had been involved with. Fitzgerald continued by saying that “…Gatsby himself didn’t believe it would come and perhaps he no longer cared.” At this point in his life, Gatsby realized that he
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course ENGLISH 100 taught by Professor N/a during the Fall '11 term at Johns Hopkins.

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The Great Gatsby - Paul Markakis Period 6 AP English The...

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