Lecture 7 - Lecture 7 STAGING/BLOCKING Blocking is the...

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Lecture 7 STAGING/BLOCKING “Blocking” is the planned pattern of movement on stage. For your scenes, you should have a very specific environment, and set up your furniture to fit that environment. When you move to staging/blocking, you might be tempted to always face out front, because we want to see your beautiful faces. However, this makes your character very two-dimensional, and unrealistic. STAGE POSITIONS Full Front, Quarter, Profile, Three Quarter, Full Back Generally speaking, the more fully the actor faces the audience, the stronger his position, but that is not always the case, especially when you add a second person. STAGE POSITIONS/SOCIAL DISTANCE Depending on the positioning of two actors, (whether they sit, slouch, kneel, or turn head various ways) you can throw focus to each other. The audience’s eye will generally go to who in the “stronger” position. Sonya had two actors practice social distance, and showed what those distances might convey (an argument, secrecy, intimacy, etc.) Also keep in mind that the weakest position for characters is to face off in a line
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course THEA 170 taught by Professor Hill during the Spring '09 term at South Carolina.

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