15651 - Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in Mexico Paul...

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Venezuelan Equine Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Encephalitis Virus in Mexico in Mexico Paul R. Earl Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas Universidad Autónomo de Nuevo León San Nicolás, NL, Mexico
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Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a mosquito-borne acute viral disease characterized by fever, chills, headache, back pain, myalgias, prostration and possibly nausea, often progressing to encephalitis. Crashing into the stall walls, a fence or a tree is typical of horses and can occur in humans. An equine pressing its head against something solid is parallel to a man holding his head with both hands. VEE is much more dangerous for equines (horses, mules and donkeys) than for man. The VEE strains most involved are IAB, AC and most importantly IE.
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In Mexico, over 200,000 equines died in 1971. This was reported. However, that enormous Culex- transmitted epidemic was from 1969 to 1975. Far far more deaths occurred, certainly way over 2 million. Also, more than one virus species was involved, e. g., St Louis Encephalitis virus (SLE).
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Why so mis reported ? FIRST: Do not know. SECOND: Did not dutifully observe, count and record. THIRD: Hiding the facts is often a routine of public health. FOURTH: No index of suspicion therefore no VEE diagnosis in people. # 3 includes the bearer of bad tidings—the innocent reporter of bad news is unpopular.
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A very important fact is that in Mexico the Sectretaria de Salud is completely separated from Patología Animal, which is part of the Secretaría de Agricultura. Patología Animal has over 100 laboratories throughout the country, but contacts between medical and veterinary interests are rare indeed. In the 70s, laboratories had only vaccine. They did not made viral identifications. They did not have sentinels, chicks or hamsters. They did not have mosquito light traps. The same impoverished laboratory conditions prevail in 2004.
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How many deaths ? No one knows. We can say—at least—that in 1969-74 in Mexico—in all 32 states there were 200,000-2,000,000 plus equine deaths and some human deaths. This lecturer was vaccinating horses in Puebla and Veracruz in 1971-74. The encephalitis virus status has not changed in 30 years, true also for tropical diseases.
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All efforts were then placed on vaccinating equines. Some cattle of many infected died of VEE also. The order of encephalitis virus may have been: 1/ VEEV, 2/ STLV, 3/ EEEV then 4/ WEEV. However, the encephalitis is usually
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course HIST 312 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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15651 - Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus in Mexico Paul...

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