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Stones2 - Stone Tools Continued Uses of Stone Tools We tend...

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Stone Tools Continued
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Uses of Stone Tools We tend to think in terms of hunting--because that is where we see the results. Butchery--both separating flesh from sinew, bone and skin, and separating bones.
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Skin preparation--scraping.
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Hunting--stabbing in various ways. But there must also have all kinds of uses associated with plant foods. This is sometimes seen in microwear on stone tools-- microscopic traces of last use. They probably used both identifiable stone tools and also odd bits and pieces.
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Stone tools were first found in Africa--in the great rift valley.
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The rift gives archaeologists access to early levels. This does not necessarily mean that the early homonids were only present here.
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Oldowan --a few flakes removed from both sides of one edge of a quartzite pebble. Power grip used. Recent research suggests that the flakes removed were used at least as much as the cores.
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The earliest homonid thought to make tools was Homo Habilis
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Oldowan Tools
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Over time, Homo Habilis was replaced by Homo Erectus.
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Lower Palaeolithic-- handaxe s and cleavers made by flaking over more of the surface. We see the introduction of using a soft hammer stone (of bone or horn) which gives more control. This implies the use of the precision grip.
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By the Middle Palaeolithic we have both Early Modern Humans and Neanderthals
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Both these hominids are associated with the Middle Palaeolithic—where se see more emphasis on flake tools .
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