Stones2 - Stone Tools Continued Uses of Stone Tools We tend...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–25. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Stone Tools Continued Uses of Stone Tools We tend to think in terms of hunting--because that is where we see the results. Butchery--both separating flesh from sinew, bone and skin, and separating bones. Skin preparation--scraping. Hunting--stabbing in various ways. But there must also have all kinds of uses associated with plant foods. This is sometimes seen in microwear on stone tools-- microscopic traces of last use. They probably used both identifiable stone tools and also odd bits and pieces. Stone tools were first found in Africa--in the great rift valley. The rift gives archaeologists access to early levels. This does not necessarily mean that the early homonids were only present here. Oldowan--a few flakes removed from both sides of one edge of a quartzite pebble. Power grip used. Recent research suggests that the flakes removed were used at least as much as the cores. The earliest homonid thought to make tools was Homo Habilis Oldowan Tools Over time, Homo Habilis was replaced by Homo Erectus. Lower Palaeolithic-- handaxe s and cleavers made by flaking over more of the surface. We see the introduction of using a soft hammer stone (of bone or horn) which gives more control. This implies the use of the precision grip. By the Middle Palaeolithic we have both Early Modern Humans and Neanderthals Both these hominids are associated with the Middle Palaeolithicwhere se see more emphasis on flake tools . The Levallois technique for making broad, flat flakes is the first prepared core ever developed. They also developed the disc core....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course ANT 290 taught by Professor Stone during the Spring '12 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Page1 / 68

Stones2 - Stone Tools Continued Uses of Stone Tools We tend...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 25. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online