FEASIBILITY - The feasibility study Page 1 of 6 <ch12...

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<ch12 toc ch14> 13 The feasibility study 13.1 Purpose 13.2 Strengths, weaknesses, and limitations 13.3 Inputs and related ideas 13.4 Concepts 13.4.1 The cost of a feasibility study 13.4.2 Types of feasibility 13.4.3 The steps in a typical feasibility study 13.4.4 The feasibility study report 13.5 Key terms 13.6 Software 13.7 References 13.1 Purpose A feasibility study is a compressed, capsule version the analysis phase of the system development life cycle aimed at determining quickly and at a reasonable cost if the problem can be solved and if it is worth solving. A feasibility study can also be viewed as an in-depth problem definition. 13.2 Strengths, weaknesses, and limitations A well-conducted feasibility study provides a sense of the likelihood of success and of the expected cost of solving the problem, and gives management a basis for making resource allocation decisions. In many organizations, the feasibility study reports for all pending projects are submitted to a steering committee where some are rejected and others accepted and prioritized. Because the feasibility study occurs near the beginning of the system development life cycle, the discovery process often uncovers unexpected problems or parameters that can significantly change the expected system scope. It is useful to discover such issues before significant funds have been expended. However, such surprises make it difficult to plan, schedule, and budget for the feasibility study itself, and close management control is needed to ensure that the cost does not balloon out of control. The purpose of a feasibility study is to determine, at a reasonable cost , if the problem is worth solving. It is important to remember that the feasibility study is preliminary. The point is to determine if the resources should be allocated to solve the problem, not to actually solve the problem. Conducting a feasibility study is time consuming and costly. For essential or obvious projects, it sometimes makes sense to skip the feasibility study. 13.3 Inputs and related ideas The feasibility study begins with the problem description ( # 12 ) prepared early in the problem definition phase of the system development life cycle. Often, the feasibility study report is the primary input to the steering committee that authorizes further work on the project. The feasibility study is, in essence, a preliminary version of the analysis phase of the system Page 1 of 6 The feasibility study 12/19/2011 http://www.hit.ac.il/staff/leonidm/information-systems/ch13.html
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development life cycle. Depending on the nature of the problem, the analyst uses various tools from Parts II, IV, and V. The information collected during the feasibility study is used during project planning
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FEASIBILITY - The feasibility study Page 1 of 6 &lt;ch12...

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