Myers34 - Module 34: Assessing Intelligence The Origins of...

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Module 34: Assessing Intelligence The Origins of Intelligence Testing Modern Tests of Mental Abilities Principles of Test Construction The Dynamics of Intelligence Stability or Change? Extremes of Intelligence
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Assessing Intelligence Psychologists define intelligence testing as a method for  assessing an individual’s mental aptitudes and comparing  them with others using numerical scores.
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Alfred Binet Alfred Binet and his  colleague Théodore Simon  practiced a more modern  form of intelligence testing  by developing questions  that would predict  children’s future progress  in the Paris school system.
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Lewis Terman In the US, Lewis Terman  adapted Binet’s test for  American school children  and named the test the  Stanford-Binet Test. The  following is the formula of  Intelligence Quotient (IQ),   introduced by William  Stern:
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David Wechsler Wechsler developed the 
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Ennis during the Winter '09 term at Waterloo.

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Myers34 - Module 34: Assessing Intelligence The Origins of...

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