Topic_1_Econ162 - Topic 1 Course Organization and...

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Economics 162 The Economy of China Topic 1 – Course Organization and Introduction Professor David Roland-Holst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-5PM, 105 Stanley Hall
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Roland-Holst 2 Economics 162 Economics 162 Adding the Course If you are not in the course but wish to add, you should consult the Economics Department ( [email protected] ). Neither the instructor nor the GSIs have the power to get you registered in the class. How the waiting list works: If actual enrollment falls below the maximum (250), students can request enrollment in order of waitlist seniority.
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Roland-Holst 3 Economics 162 Economics 162 Textbook and Other Readings Required: Barry Naughton, The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth, The MIT Press, 2006 Topical readings will be distributed (electronically) throughout the semester. Justin Yifu Lin, Demystifying the Chinese Economy, Cambridge, 2012. Jinglian Wu, Understanding and Interpreting Chinese Economic Reform , 2005 James Kynge, China Shakes the World: A Giant’s Troubled Rise, 2007. Janos Kornai, The Socialist System , 1992 Barry Naughton, Growing Out of the Plan: Chinese Economic Reform, 1978-1993, 1996 Nicholas Lardy, Integrating China into the Global Economy, 2001
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Roland-Holst 4 Economics 162 Economics 162 Prerequisites • This course uses microeconomic concepts extensively, and therefore requires a solid understanding of price theory. • Economics 100 A & B, or Economics 101 A & B, or PENR100, are the prerequisites.
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Roland-Holst 5 Economics 162 Economics 162 Useful Information • Midterm: March 22 (Thursday), 3:30-5PM, in class – 35% of grade • Final: May 11 (Friday), 7-10PM – 65% of grade • Class schedule changes – No class on February 21
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Roland-Holst 6 Economics 162 Economics 162 Contact David Roland-Holst Email: [email protected] Office: 338 Giannini Hall Hours: Wednesday 2-4PM
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Roland-Holst 7 Economics 162 Economics 162 Motivation • Intellectual curiosity about China and its impact on the rest of the world • Family, neighbor, friend, and classmate connection to China • Doing business or working in or with China • Public policy toward China
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Roland-Holst 8 Economics 162 Economics 162 Themes of the Course § Reform and transition from plan to market § Economic development from low to high income § Opening and integration with the world
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Roland-Holst 9 Economics 162 Economics 162 Features of the Course • Descriptive § Facts § What, when, where, who? § Not easy, limited transparency § Analytical § About the linkages among facts § Why, how? § Even more difficult, data fragmentary, distorted
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Roland-Holst 10 Economics 162 Economics 162 China in Broader Perspective As a transition economy § Eastern Europe, former Soviet Union, Vietnam As an emerging market § East Asia, India As a large economy § Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC) As a geopolitical power § U.S., E.U., Russia, Japan As a model of economic governance § Capitalism, democracy, and all that
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Roland-Holst 11 Economics 162 Economics 162 Topics (chapters in Naughton) • Topic 1. Introduction (Introduction) • Topic 2. Initial conditions (1, 2, 3, 5)
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course ECON 162 taught by Professor Hanemann during the Spring '07 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Topic_1_Econ162 - Topic 1 Course Organization and...

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