my plant lab 2 - The photosynthetic rate of Cabomba...

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The photosynthetic rate of Cabomba caroliniana and Spinacia oleracea – effects of light intensity and light quality. By Ismail Abdulle 5640167 Bio 2137 Section A5 Demonstrator: Eric and John Partner: Ramon Caballerio October, 02 2010 Department of Biology University Of Ottawa
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Introduction Photosynthesis is a process in which light radiation is captured from the sun and utilized by photosynthetic organisms to drive the world’s ecosystems. During this process, carbon dioxide and water are taken up, and with the addition of solar radiation of a precise wavelength, various carbohydrates and oxygen is produced. It has been clearly understood through rigorous research the photosynthetic process. It occurs in two steps and in different locations in the Cabomba caroliniana (Raven and Evert, 2005). The first step, the light reaction, occurs in the thylakoid stacks of the Cabomba caroliniana, a membrane bound compartment of the chloroplast. Here, light energy is transformed into reducing power by the formation of NADPH from NADH+. ATP, a critical chemical energy, is also produced. The second step of the photosynthetic process occurs in stroma, the fluid portion of the chloroplast, of Cabomba caroliniana . Here, products of the first step are utilized to drive the reduction of carbon dioxide to form carbohydrates (antlfinger and wendel, 1997). The overall purposes of this experiment involves indentifying the effects light quality and light intensity have on photosynthesis in Cabomba caroliniana along with indentifying which chlorophyll pigments in Spinacia oleracea absorb light for photosynthesis and which do not. Pigments to be studied are chlorophyll a and b, Xanthophylls, and carotenes. Two hypothesizes are formulated. One, if the rate of oxygen production is affected by light intensity, then the rate of oxygen production would be directly proportional to the amount of light introduced to the plant. Two, if the rate of oxygen production is affected by the wavelength of the light, then the rate of oxygen production would be directly proportional to the frequency of the wavelength of light. An experimental design is developed to test these hypothesizes. We Measure the photosynthetic rate of Cabomba caroliniana while varying the light intensity and light quality. Materials and method
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A. Photosynthetic rate (see pages 3-5 in Bio2137 lab manual) Modifications made to the procedure laid out in the lab manual are the amount of stem cut off from the Cabomba caroliniana and the amount of time allowing the reaction vessel to equilibrate. Due to limited amounts of Cabomba caroliniana, only 0.5 cm of the stem was cut off rather than 1.0 cm. Rather than allowing the reaction vessel to equilibrate for 10 minutes, we allowed it to equilibrate for 13 minutes. B. Effect of amount of light (see pages 5 and 6 in Bio2137 lab manual)
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course BIO Bio2137 taught by Professor Namroud during the Fall '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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my plant lab 2 - The photosynthetic rate of Cabomba...

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