Syllabus(43) - eSyllabus Northwest Vista College Course...

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eSyllabus Northwest Vista College KINE2178 001 2012 Spring Course: Section: Term: Fine & Performing Arts and Kinesiology YOUNG, DUKE [email protected] Jogging II 72253 1 2 Department: Instructor: Phone: Email: OfficeLocation: Course Title: CRN: Lec. Hrs. per wk: Lab. Hrs. per wk: Credit Hours: This course is a continuation of Jogging I with a focus on increased cardio respiratory endurance. This course will expand on the training strategies from Jogging I with specific techniques to increase cardiorespiratory endurance. Course Description (e-catalog): Prerequisites: KINE 1178 or instructor approval PREREQUISITES, CO-REQUISITES and OTHER REQUIREMENTS: TEXTBOOKS (including ISBN#) and REQUIRED MATERIALS/RECOMMENDED READING: COURSE CONTENT: An understanding of how jogging can contribute to physical fitness. An understanding of training principals related to an efficient jogging program. An understanding of the care and prevention of jogging related injuries. An understanding of safety procedures related to jogging. An awareness of road racing as an extension of a jogging program. An ability to program a jogging program consistent with ones lifestyle and motivation. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES / PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES: METHODS OF MEASUREMENT (grade requirements): 2/22/2012 Page 1 of 4
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Northwest Vista College KINE2178 001 2012 Spring Course: Section: Term: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: A. Attendance: Effective Spring Term 2010, student absences will be recorded from the first day the class meets. Regular and punctual attendance in all classes and laboratories, day and evening, is required. Students who are absent for any reason should always consult with their instructors. Course syllabi must provide specific information regarding attendance, including, for courses involving the internet, online activity that constitutes “attendance.” Also, both tardiness and early departure from class may be considered forms of absenteeism. In all cases, students will be held responsible for completion of course requirements covered in their absence. Additionally, it is the student’s responsibility to drop a course for nonattendance. Course instructors establish policy with regard to attendance in their respective syllabi and may drop a student for excessive absences. Absences are considered excessive when more than 12.5 percent of the total contact hours of instruction in a semester, including lecture and lab, are missed. For example, in a three-credit-hour lecture class, students may be dropped after more than six
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