4 The Upper Cervical Adjustment

4 The Upper Cervical Adjustment - Upper Cervical Adjusting...

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Upper Cervical Adjusting
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Innate Intelligence Chiropractors recognize that an inborn "innate intelligence" drives the human machine with the utilization of the nervous system. Specific upper cervical care uses a mechanistic approach in the assessment of the subluxation and the application of the adjustment while appreciating the "vitalistic" philosophy of health and healing. Kirk Eriksen
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How Much Force To Use Sweat RW. Minimum Force vs. Moderate Force in the Occipital- Atlanto-Axial Subluxation Complex (OCP-C1-C2). Am Chiropr, February 1988:22-24. Coefficient of Friction: "Definition. The ratio of tangential force to the normal interbody compressive force required to initiate a sliding motion between two bodies. "The tangential component in the healthy joints is generally very small, about 1 percent of the normal component. This is due to very low joint friction. "The value of the coefficient of friction in the animal inkle joint is . 005." Adjusting the atlas area is not a simple procedure. It is as delicate as the most complicated surgery and does require an endless process of study and discipline. Eriksen K, Upper Cervical Subluxation Complex, a review of the chiropractic and medical literature. 2004 Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, MD
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How Much Force To Use Sweat RW: Am Chiropr, February 1988:22-24 Editorial Comment The normal human synovial joint will not wear out with normal use and under normal loads. The coefficient of friction is roughly equal to that of ice on ice. Due to the unique architecture of the upper cervical joints, this area should be adjusted differently from the rest of the spine. There are no interlocking facet joints holding these articulations in place. Upper cervical biomechanical stability is accomplished primarily from the weight of the head and the articular surfaces, muscles, and ligaments. … upper cervical correction appears to require little force. The displacement used in the hand and instrument adjustment may vary from about a six-teenth of an inch to a quarter of an inch. It has been observed clinically that too much depth will usually cause the joint to lock up, or an asymmetrical correction can result. A deep adjustment may cause the suboccipital muscles to splint as a protective mechanism. This is why the axiom "light is right" may appear appropriate when it comes to the upper cervical adjustment.
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Depending upon the type of cervical manipulative technique used, preload forces range from 0 to approximately 50 N, and peak impulse forces range from approximately 40 N to approximately 120 N. The forces delivered during cervical manipulations develop faster than during manipulation of the thoracic spine and sacroiliac joint.
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course RADIOLOGIA sexto taught by Professor Cristina during the Spring '12 term at UNAM MX.

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4 The Upper Cervical Adjustment - Upper Cervical Adjusting...

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