W4 Systems Development Life Cycle

W4 Systems Development Life Cycle - 1 The Systems...

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The Systems Development Life Cycle The Systems Development Life Cycle Narciso Astorga, Chee-Chee Manghram, Brandi Murobayashi Rhonda Powell, Tina Schniebs ACC 210 September 13, 2010 Michael Wells 1
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The Systems Development Life Cycle The Systems Development Life Cycle In reviewing Riordan’s current accounting systems, it has been noted that it is no longer acceptable to continue with the current accounting system because of problems presented when integrating information for the creation of financial statements. The extensive manual labor that it requires to compile data and the need for all reports to have the same format have contributed to the lack of support for the current systems. However, to implement a new accounting system, it is important to follow the four stages of Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) so as to achieve the best results from the process. SDLC is divided into the next four stages: Planning and Investigation, Analysis, Design and the last Implementation, Follow-up and Maintenance (Bagranoff, Simkin, & Norman, 2008). Because it is the first step in the SDLC, we believe that it is of immense importance to plan before implementing that way we know exactly what is needed from the new system and can plan for any problems that may arise. By planning before we can eliminate excess costs, and time invested into failing projects. To determine the requirements needed for the accounting information systems for Riordan Manufacturing, first the organization must outline what is needed. At the present time, Riordan Manufacturing needs a Finance and Accounting system that will be compatible throughout the company at all of its sites. Currently, one location has software that can be used only at that location, as the license does not include application source code. Another location is using software produced by a company no longer in business. Finally, a third location has purchased an entirely different system from the
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course ACC 101 taught by Professor Black during the Spring '12 term at University of Phoenix.

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W4 Systems Development Life Cycle - 1 The Systems...

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