Sociology 158 Notebook

Sociology 158 Notebook - Introduction 14:48 For the first...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction 14:48 For the first time in human history, most people in the world are living in cities (urban lives). By 2050, 75% of the world’s population will live in cities. 2000 data: City is defined as having “legally defined boundaries, recognized urban status, and its own local government” who legally defines the boundaries of a city in the US? The state legislature In 1900, largest cities were: New York (3.4m), Chicago (1.7m), Philadelphia (1.3m) In 2000, largest cities were: New York (8.0m), Los Angeles (3.7m), Chicago (2.9m) A open region includes the major city and the urban regions surrounding it. Crabgrass Frontier Early puritan walking city Suburbanization before and after the automobile The development of urban ghettos The failure of public housing, the politics of city boundaries Classes 2-3 Class 4: Subprime Crisis, Housing Crisis, Financial Crisis House prices sky-rocket after 2000 Piggyback Loans: “piggybacked” onto traditional loan; when you received 2 loans: cash for down payment and loan of the rest of the purchase; therefore, the borrowed puts down $0 for the home purchase Class 5: Urban Renewal Robert Moses’s Projects in New York: freeways Jane Jabobs: The Death and Life of Great American Cities Overall prescription for cities as ever more diversity, density, and dynamism—in effect, to crowd people... Class 6: The Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles Schools of Urban Sociology The LA School The central focus of the LA School is a “sprawling, polycentric character of the urban, built…” The NY School Characterized by an interest in the central city, especially Manhattan. What is and should the central city be like? Can it be a place where the wealthy, the middle class, the working class and the poor reside? How to defend… Class 7: Global Cities Class 8: Separation/Integration Class 9: Immigration Class 11: Crime Number of Murders per Year in LA and NY Class 12: Cities in Film, Music and Literature Class 13: Green Cities Class 14: The Economy Class 15: Education Charter Schools NCLB Mayoral Control Class 19: Riots and Race Relations Course Requirements GIS Mapping Projects 2 Quizzes 1 Midterm Medieval Cities 14:48 Trace suburbanization to around 1815 in the US Medieval Cities 14:48 England Current freeway system stays on the periphery but nothing crosses the center of the city Freeways stop because they are not finished; they did not want to displace the people living in the areas where freeways would need to be built Medieval London was a “walking city” Next to a river (water is the main mode of transportation) Had a wall surrounding the majority of it (protection from attacks)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 158 taught by Professor Halle during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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Sociology 158 Notebook - Introduction 14:48 For the first...

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