Mapping Project 1

Mapping Project 1 - Kayla Butler 203-706-009 Section...

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Kayla Butler 203-706-009 Section 1C (Morgan) April 28, 2011 The Residential Distribution of Whites in the Los Angeles and New York Regions: Applying the Concepts of Racial Separation and Segregation Based on the United States Census data from 2000, the following maps show the residential distribution of those individuals who identified as “non-Hispanic white” in the Los Angeles and New York regions. The data from these regions demonstrate what Andrew Beveridge and Susan Weber argue in They conclude that New York has come to bear a resemblance to Los Angeles in that higher concentrations of non-minorities are moving away from the urban areas and out to the peripheries (Halle, 23). Beginning with the New York region, we see that the highest concentrations of whites (between 80 and 100 percent of individuals) vary in each of the five burrows. Specifically, the highest concentrations of whites in Queens occupy the eastern periphery, curving into the north and the south. In Brooklyn, the highest concentrations appear in the southern section whereas the Bronx shows high concentrations in the northern section. Staten Island is almost completely occupied by high concentrations of whites with a slight decline on the northern periphery. Manhattan, the most interesting of the burrows, contains the highest concentrations of whites in its central areas. In the Los Angeles region, the pattern of the distribution of whites appears a bit differently. The areas with the highest concentrations of whites appear along all the peripheries. More specifically, the coastal regions from Malibu all the way south to Huntington Beach—with the exception of a small area near Long Beach—mainly show concentrations of whites between 80 and 100 percent of the population. The eastern and
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 158 taught by Professor Halle during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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Mapping Project 1 - Kayla Butler 203-706-009 Section...

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