South-Korea-Affirmative---Starter-Pack---Samford

South-Korea-Affirmative---Starter-Pack---Samford - Samford...

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Samford Debate Institute 1 Opening Packet South Korea AFF South Korea Affirmative Index
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2 BAYLOR BRIEFS SECOND NEGATIVE South Korea 1ac (1/7) Plan: The United States federal government should remove its troops from South Korea. Questions, ask. Advantage 1: Accidental War The Korean peninsula is extremely dangerous and the potential for incidents along the border is ever-present—the recent warship explosion in the Yellow Sea recent events on the peninsula prove this argument to be true: Doug Bandow , March 30, 20 10 (Senior Fellow, CATO Institute), “South Korea Needs Better Defense.” Online. Internet. Accessed April 1, 2010 at http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=11628 A South Korean warship sank in the Yellow Sea following an explosion Friday. North Korean involvement is widely suspected, but Seoul says no conclusions have yet been reached. The incident, irrespective of the details, should remind officials in Seoul that the Korean peninsula remains extraordinarily unstable . Pyongyang has long used brinkmanship as a negotiating technique. The North employed its usual array of rhetorical bombs in response to recently concluded joint maneuvers between U.S. and South Korean forces. And ships of both nations exchanged fire last November around the ill-defined sea boundary between the two countries .
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Samford Debate Institute 3 Opening Packet South Korea AFF This incident is different than past crises with North Korea—there is a credible threat of miscalculation to war from North Korea: David Sanger , May 28, 20 10 (staff writer, New York Times), “In the Koreas, Five Possible Ways to War.” New York Times. Online. Internet. Accessed June 11, 2010 at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/weekinreview/30sanger.html USUALLY, there is a familiar cycle to Korea crises . Like a street gang showing off its power to run amok in a well-heeled neighborhood, the North Koreans launch a missile over Japan or set off a nuclear test or stage an attack — as strong evidence indicates they did in March, when a South Korean warship was torpedoed. Expressions of outrage follow. So do vows that this time, the North Koreans will pay a steep price. In time, though, the United States and North Korea’s neighbors — China, Japan, South Korea and Russia — remind one another that they have nothing to gain from a prolonged confrontation, much less a war . Gradually, sanctions get watered down. Negotiations reconvene. Soon the North hints it can be enticed or bribed into giving up a slice of its nuclear program. Eventually, the cycle repeats. The White House betting is that the latest crisis, stemming from the March attack, will also abate without much escalation. But there is more than a tinge of doubt . The big risk, as always, is what happens if the North Koreans make a major miscalculation . (It wouldn’t be their first. Sixty years ago, Mr. Kim’s father, Kim Il-sung, thought the West wouldn’t fight
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South-Korea-Affirmative---Starter-Pack---Samford - Samford...

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