FMW NEG Korea Shared Part 2

FMW NEG Korea Shared Part 2 - FMW NEG Korea Shared Part 2...

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FMW NEG Korea Shared Part 2 SDI ‘10 1/25 FMW Lab NEG Korea Shared Part 2 NEG Korea Shared Part 2 ............................................................................................................. 1 DA Korean Deterrence 1NC .......................................................................................................... 2 DA Korean Deterrence - Links ....................................................................................................... 3 DA Asian Assurance 1NC .............................................................................................................. 4 DA Assurance – Uniqueness .......................................................................................................... 5 DA Assurance - Links .................................................................................................................... 6 DA Assurance - Impacts .............................................................................................................. 10 AT Anti-Americanism makes pullout inevitable .......................................................................... 11 AT Naval and air forces create enough deterrence ...................................................................... 12 AT End of the cold war has changed the situation in Korea ........................................................ 13 AT Regional balancing ................................................................................................................ 14 AT Ground forces can be quickly moved in ................................................................................. 15 DA South Korean Politics – Links – Plan popular ........................................................................ 17 DA South Korean Politics – Links – US presence controversial .................................................... 18 DA US-South Korean (ROK) Alliance good - Links ...................................................................... 19 DA US-ROK Alliance good – impacts .......................................................................................... 20 DA Economy - links .................................................................................................................... 22 DA Chinese Influence bad ........................................................................................................... 24 CP Consult China ....................................................................................................................... 25 1
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FMW NEG Korea Shared Part 2 SDI ‘10 2/25 FMW Lab DA Korean Deterrence 1NC A. Uniqueness - Deterrence commitment high now. Dr. Kelly, Prof of Political Science, ’09  (Robert, Ph.D. International Relations from Ohio State,  Dec. 15, http://asiansecurityblog.wordpress.com/2009/12/15/should-the-us-pull-out-of-south- korea-1-yes/, da: 7-26-10, Should the “US Pull Out of South Korea?”, twm) Last month US SecDef Gates pledged the most formal statement yet of US “extended deterrence”   to South Korea in history . Extended deterrence is an IR theory term. A country deters aggression against itself by a powerful  military.  A strong military drives up the costs of conquering a country, and so it deters aggression.   During the Cold War, the US extended its deterrence to its weak and exposed allies. Countries   like  West Germany and  South Korea could not withstand a communist onslaught alone, so the US   pledged to defend them by extending its security umbrella . Such ‘collective security’ made everyone safer  against the communists. In Korea, this has always included the use of nuclear weapons, as Gates made clear again  week. B. Link - Ground forces key to deterrence. Singh, senior research fellow at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, and Il-Young,  president of the Indo-Korean Policy Forum, ‘03   [2003, Lakhvinder Singh and Il-Young Kim , “Time to Keep  Going: The Role and Structure of U.S. Forces in a Unified Korea,” Pacific Focus, Volume 18 Issue 1, Pages 65 – 87, Center for  International Studies, Inha University, twm]   As has been shown in the recent military conflicts in Europe and South Asia, almost all military   contingencies still require the use of ground forces to fight or to deter wars, despite the   increasingly excessive use of air or naval force.  Thus,  even if U.S. air and naval forces remained   stationed in Korea, the absence of U.S. ground forces would seriously undermine the deterrent
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