AFF CHAMP ALLIANCE ADVANTAGE 63

AFF CHAMP ALLIANCE ADVANTAGE 63 - WNDI 2010 Champs 1...

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WNDI 2010 1 Champs Alliance Advantage Alliance Advantage – Champs Lab 2010
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***Futenma Hurts Alliance***
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WNDI 2010 3 Champs Alliance Advantage Futenma Hurts Alliance - Infighting Okinawa is the largest threat to the US-Japan alliance – the US refuses to relocate troops unless a new base is built on Okinawa Eric Talmadge, writer for the Associated Press, 06-22 -2010, “US-Japan security pact turns 50, faces new strains” Businessweek http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9GG68080.htm But while the alliance is one of the strongest Washington has anywhere in the world, it has come under intense pressure lately over a plan to make sweeping reforms that would pull back roughly 8,600 Marines from Okinawa to the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam. The move was conceived in response to opposition on Okinawa to the large U.S. military presence there -- more than half of the U.S. troops in Japan are on Okinawa, which was one of the bloodiest battlefields of World War II. Though welcomed by many at first, the relocation plan has led to renewed Okinawan protests over the U.S. insistence it cannot be carried out unless a new base is built on Okinawa to replace one that has been set for closing for more than a decade. A widening rift between Washington and Tokyo over the future of the Futenma Marine Corps Air Station was a major factor in the resignation of Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama earlier this month. It could well plague Kan as well.
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Futenma Hurts Alliance – Spillover The Futenma dispute must be solved – failure to resolve it creates a domino effect that would cripple the alliance in the long term John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy in Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, 03-06 - 2010, “Okinawa and the new domino effect” Asia Times http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/LC06Dh01.html You’d think that, with so many Japanese bases, the United States wouldn’t make a big fuss about closing one of them. Think again. The current battle over the Marine Corps air base at Futenma on Okinawa -- an island prefecture almost 1,000 miles south of Tokyo that hosts about three dozen U.S. bases and 75% of American forces in Japan -- is just revving up . In fact, Washington seems ready to stake its reputation and its relationship with a new Japanese government on the fate of that base alone, which reveals much about U.S. anxieties in the age of Obama. What makes this so strange , on the surface, is that Futenma is an obsolete base. Under an agreement the Bush administration reached with the previous Japanese government, the U.S. was already planning to move most of the Marines now at Futenma to the island of Guam. Nonetheless, the Obama administration is insisting, over the protests of Okinawans and the objections of Tokyo, on completing that agreement by building a new partial replacement base in a less heavily populated part of Okinawa. The current row between Tokyo and Washington is no mere “Pacific squall ,” as Newsweek dismissively described it
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course DEBATE 101 taught by Professor None during the Spring '12 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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AFF CHAMP ALLIANCE ADVANTAGE 63 - WNDI 2010 Champs 1...

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