DA NEG READINESS TIA 38 - WNDI 2010 1 Readiness DA...

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WNDI 1 2010 Readiness DA Readiness DA WNDI 2010
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Position Explanation The readiness DA essentially says that withdrawing troops from their current location sends a message of weakness to adversaries abroad. Adversaries will take this sign and cause wars, proliferation, or terrorism. This is a good DA because it links to most topics on the resolution and has a strong impact story.
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WNDI 3 2010 Readiness DA Readiness 1NC Shell (1/2) Change in the military causes problem with readiness in the status quo Michael T. Morrissey , Lieutenant Colonel. “Reset: reduce risk, improve readiness.” March 2009 . http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Reset:+reduce+risk,+improve+readiness.-a0213232141 The U.S. is involved in a war lasting more than eight years. The Army is engaged in Iraq and Afghanistan and is also deployed to approximately 80 countries. Simultaneously, it is defending the homeland and is ready to support domestic crises. As outlined in Field Manual 3-0 Operations, persistent conflict and instability are the projected future; a future affected by trends, such as globalization, population growth, urbanization, demand for scarce resources, climate change, weapons of mass destruction, proliferation and failed states. In this environment, the Army continues to play an indispensable role, executing national security strategy. The Secretary of the Army and Army Chief of Staff have assessed the Army as "out of balance ." The effects of high operation al tempo combined with insufficient recovery time for personnel, families and equipment resulted in readiness consumption at an unsustainable rate . To restore balance by 2011, leadership has given the Army four imperatives -- sustain, prepare, reset and transform. Army Force Generation. The Army purged the old system of tiered readiness and implemented the Army Force Generation model, known as ARFORGEN, to achieve its four imperatives. Simply, ARFORGEN is the development of increased unit readiness. Resources are allocated by deployment sequence; ensuring units are mission capable by deployment dates. Operational requirements drive ARFORGEN and include prioritization of resourcing, manning, equipping, sustaining and sourcing. (See the 2007 U.S. Army Posture Statement, Addendum H: Army Force Generation. Another informative article is "Reset after Multiple in-lieu-of-Missions" by LTC Geoffrey P. Buhlig in the July- September 2008 edition of Fires.) The ARFORGEN model consists of three phases--reset, train/ready and available. Of the three phases, reset contains an inordinate level of organizational risk as new unit leadership faces a multitude of challenges , such as high personnel turnover, "at risk" Soldiers, family reintegration and absent unit organizational systems. According to GEN George W. Casey, "The intent of reset is to recover personnel and equipment to a state of readiness at the end of six months so the unit can train up for the next mission." With the current strategic environment and a future of projected conflict, it is more important than
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course DEBATE 101 taught by Professor None during the Spring '12 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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DA NEG READINESS TIA 38 - WNDI 2010 1 Readiness DA...

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