Realism Good - Realism Team 2010 1/81 7 Week Seniors...

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Unformatted text preview: Realism Team 2010 1/81 7 Week Seniors REALISM GOOD 1 Realism Team 2010 2/81 7 Week Seniors 2 Realism Team 2010 3/81 7 Week Seniors 2AC- REALISM Realism is true and inevitable a shift away collapses into chaos. Mearsheimer , 1 (professor of political science at University of Chicago, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics , pg. 361, 2001) The optimists' claim that security competition and war among the great powers has been burned out of the system is wrong . In fact, all of the major states around the globe still care deeply about the balance of power and are destined to compete for power among themselves for the foreseeable future . Consequently, realism will offer the most powerful explanations of international politics over the next century , and this will be true even if the debates among academic and policy elites are dominated by non-realist theories. In short, the real world remains a realist world . States still fear each other and seek to gain power at each other's expense , because international anarchy-the driving force behind greatpower behavior-did not change with the end of the Cold War, and there are few signs that such change is likely any time soon. States remain the principal actors in world politics and there is still no night watchman standing above them. For sure, the collapse of the Soviet Union caused a major shift in the global distribution of power. But it did not give rise to a change in the anarchic structure of the system, and without that kind of profound change, there is no reason to expect the great powers to behave much differently in the new century than they did in previous centuries. Indeed, considerable evidence from the 1990s indicates that power politics has not disappeared from Europe and Northeast Asia, the regions in which there are two or more great powers, as well as possible great powers such as Germany and Japan. There is no question, however, that the competition for power over the past decade has been low-key. Still, there is potential for intense security competion among the great powers that might lead to a major war. Probably the best evidence of that possibility is the fact that the United States maintains about one hundred thousand troops each in Europe and in Northeast Asia for the...
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Realism Good - Realism Team 2010 1/81 7 Week Seniors...

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