34161 - Biostatistics course Part 7 Introduction to...

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Biostatistics course Part 7 Introduction to inferential statistics Dr. Sc. Nicolas Padilla Raygoza Department of Nursing and Obstetrics, Division Health Sciences and Engineering Campus Celaya-Salvatierra University of Guanajuato Mexico
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Biosketch Medical Doctor by University Autonomous of Guadalajara. Pediatrician by the Mexican Council of Certification on Pediatrics. Postgraduate Diploma on Epidemiology, London School of Hygine and Tropical Medicine, University of London. Master Sciences with aim in Epidemiology, Atlantic International University. Doctorate Sciences with aim in Epidemiology, Atlantic International University. Associated Professor B, Department of Nursing and Obstetrics, Division Of Health Sciences and Engineering, Campus Celaya Salvatierra, University of Guanajuato. padillawarm@gmail.com
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Competencies The reader will define what is inferential statistics. He (she) will know what is a sampling distribution. He (she) will know and define properties of sampling distribution. He (she) will analyze implications of sampling distribution because works with samples.
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Population and sample We want to measure prevalence of Entamoeba histolytic in Mexican Republic. We cannot measure it in all Mexican population, because financial and practice reasons. We can measure the prevalence in a Mexican sub-population, called sample.
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How do we select a sample? It is more easy to obtain a sample from Mexico city, but it is probably that the prevalence of Entamoeba histolytic is different to the prevalence in all country, and we had biased prevalence from all Mexican population. If we choice a sample by chance, it is probably that we avoid biases. The random sample ( to chance) is when only the chance decide who is included and who is not.
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Example of two samples The chief of Sanitary Jurisdiction want to research prevalence of E. histolytic between scholars in his jurisdiction. The project is give to epidemiologist and there are a few resources for this project. A community medical doctor want to know the prevalence of amebiasis in scholars. He contract two people to collect the data.
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Example of two samples The epidemiologist obtained a sample of 10% of scholars registered in schools in the jurisdiction. From 500
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course STAT 312 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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34161 - Biostatistics course Part 7 Introduction to...

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