Hegemony-Disadvantage---Starter-Pack---Capitol

Hegemony-Disadvantage---Starter-Pack---Capitol - HEGEMONY...

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HEGEMONY DA            CAPITOL CLASSIC STARTER KIT  2k10
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HEGEMONY DA            CAPITOL CLASSIC STARTER KIT  2k10 1NC SHELL A.  UNIQUENESS U.S. HARD POWER IS AT ITS PEAK LIEBER  Prof of Government @ GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY  2K10 Robert-; TAKING SIDES: CLASHING VIEWS IN AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY, 2010, 41. In the realm of "     hard power     ," while the army and Marines have been      stretched      by the       wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the fact is that      no other      country possesses anything like the       capacity of the United States to project power around the globe. American military technology and   sheer might      remain      unmatched      -- no other country can compete in the arenas of       land, sea, or air warfare. China claims that it spends $45 billion annually on defense, but the truth comes closer to three times that figure. Still, America's $625 billion defense budget      dwarfs        even that. The latter amounts to just 4.2 percent of GDP. This contrasts with 6.6 percent at the height of the Reagan buildup and double-digit percentages during the   early and middle years of the Cold War.
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HEGEMONY DA            CAPITOL CLASSIC STARTER KIT  2k10 1NC SHELL B.  LINK Military presence is CRITICAL to power-projection and hegemony – ALL potential crises require extended deployment of forces – empirically, operations without prolonged US military presence have been UTTER STRATEGIC FAILURES Kagan and O’Hanlon 2k7 Frederick W. Kagan is a resident scholar at AEI. Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow and Sydney Stein Jr. Chair in foreign policy studies at the Brookings Institution, 4/24/07, “The Case for Larger Ground Forces,” American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, http://www.aei.org/docLib/20070424_Kagan20070424.pdf As we see, a quick review of some of the potential crises that might require the use of American military power turns up several that would demand the prolonged deployment of US forces as large as or larger than those currently in Iraq and Afghanistan, even on fairly optimistic assumptions . There are many other potential problems, including the challenges identified at the beginning of this section in Iran and North Korea . Iran, a country of nearly 70 million people, could well demand an American commitment of hundreds of thousands of soldiers in worst-case scenarios of regime collapse or regime change; force requirements of 200,000-300,000 are highly likely even in fairly optimistic scenarios for a war with Iran. The point of this assessment is not to advocate any particular approach to any of these problems.
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Hegemony-Disadvantage---Starter-Pack---Capitol - HEGEMONY...

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