313 BQ Nuclear Power 1AC

313 BQ Nuclear Power 1AC - FILE NAME DDI 2008 Your...

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FILE NAME DDI 2008 <BQ>    Your Name 1AC Contention 1 – Inherency Nuclear energy is the alternative to fossil fuels but current incentives don’t work  Jack Spencer is a Research Fellow at the Thomas A. Roe Institute for Economic Policy Studies at the Heritage Foundation. 11/15/ 07 . “Competitive Nuclear Energy Investment: Avoiding Past Policy Mistakes” http://www.heritage.org/Research/EnergyandEnvironment/bg2086.cfm Nuclear power is a proven, safe, affordable, and environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels. It can generate massive quantities of electricity with almost no atmospheric emissions and can offset Amer ica's growing dependence on foreign energy sources . The French have used it to minimize their dependence on foreign energy , and at one time the United States was on the path to do the same. However, the commercial nuclear energy industry in the U.S. is no longer thriving. Investors hesitate to embrace nuclear power fully, despite significant regu latory relief and economic incentives. This reluctance is not due to any inherent flaw in the economics of nuclear power or some unavoidable risk. Instead, investors are reacting to the historic role that federal, state, and local governments have played both in encouraging growth in the industry and in bringing on its demise. Investors doubt that federal, state, and local governments will allow nuclear energy to flourish in the long term. They have already lost billions of dollars because of bad public policy 1
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FILE NAME DDI 2008 <BQ>    Your Name 1AC Contention II: Proliferation Industrial and developing nations surpass the US in nuclear energy Nicolas Loris and Jack Spencer , Research Assistant and Research Fellow Institute for Economic Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation, 7/2/ 08 , The Heritage Foundation, “Nuclear Energy: What we can learn from other countries” http://www.heritage.org/Research/Energyandenvironment/wm1977.cfm France is an example of a country that developed nuclear energy to reduce foreign energy dependence after the oil shock of the 1970s. It now receives nearly 80 percent of its electricity from nuclear power and is a net exporter of electricity . [1] Germany, alternatively, decided to phase out nuclear energy for political reasons and now imports some of this energy.[2] Japan is another country that has looked to nuclear power as a clean, safe and reliable form of energy. Nuclear power already provides 30 percent of the country's electricity ; however, Japan is working to increase this to 37 percent by 2009 and 41 percent by 2017.[3] Finland, ranking fifth in the world for per capita electricity consumption, has a significant incentive to secure long-term energy solutions. Embracing nuclear energy as part of an effort to decrease the nation's dependency on foreign energy sources, Finland has begun constructing a modern 1,600-megawatt reactor, which will likely be a model used throughout the United States. Finland already gets 28 percent of its electricity from nuclear power, and a
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313 BQ Nuclear Power 1AC - FILE NAME DDI 2008 Your...

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