9.24.2009

9.24.2009 - Thursday, September 24, 2009 Their picture of...

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Thursday, September 24, 2009 Their picture of procreation in terms of spirit excludes the male, but clearly describes spirit and matter as vitally participant. Unlike Descartes, the trobrianders have no trouble connecting the mind and body. They are fundamentally non-dualistic. They have no problem grasping… ultimately the generation of life remains mysterious. Materially they are wrong, but society is perfectly vital and viable. There was no shortage of children. St. Augustine’s confession- critical foundation of Christianity, and western civilization. What his confessions describe is a journey, like Descartes, that he took. Basically he moves from his alienated self (something wrong with himself, something lacking) to his true life. His alienated self is the outside (body), and he shifts to the soul or spirit. The model for his journey was based on the prodigal son (from story of Luke). The father of the prodigal son had other sons, yet when his son who had become bad returns there is a greater joy and celebration for the return
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course ANTH 146 taught by Professor Evens during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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9.24.2009 - Thursday, September 24, 2009 Their picture of...

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