02_Basic_DC_1 - University of Nevada, Reno Electrical &...

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Unformatted text preview: University of Nevada, Reno Electrical & Biomedical Engineering Department EE220L Circuits I Laboratory Lab. 2: Basic DC Circuits, Part I 1 OBJECTIVE This lab introduces the basic properties of resistors and resistor networks, along with serial and parallel equivalent circuits. Voltage and current dividers will also be explored. PROCEDURE I. RESISTANCE 1. Obtain resistors of values 1k , 4.7k , and 8.2k . Use a resistor color code chart (one can be found in Appendix A) to verify their values. 2. Using a multimeter, record the resistance values of each resistor. Note : Do not touch the resistor leads with your hands when you are recording your measurements. If you do, your body resistance will likely affect your measurements, as you are putting your body resistance in parallel with the circuit. 3. Now, for all three resistors, determine the percentage difference between your measured value and the accepted value that is decoded using the resistor color code. 4. Is the percentage difference within the manufacturing (initial) tolerances indicated by the color code for each resistor? For example: My color code says I have a 1.5k resistor with a tolerance of 5%, but when I measure the resistance of that resistor, I measure 1.550k . This indicates that the resistor is 3.33% off from the rated value and within the 5% tolerance specified. But, if that original 1.5k resistor had a color code indicating it was a 1% tolerance resistor, then the resistor would be out of tolerance. II. SERIES RESISTANCE Figure 1: Circuit 1 - Two Series Resistances 1. Build Circuit 1. With a multimeter, record the resistance of the circuit. 2. Calculate the series resistance mathematically using the series resistance equation: R Total = R 1 +R 2 ++R N 3. How does the measured value compare to the calculated value? Hint: Utilize the percent difference equation. % Difference = expected " measured expected x 100% University of Nevada, Reno Electrical & Biomedical Engineering Department EE220L Circuits I Laboratory Lab. 2: Basic DC Circuits, Part I 2 Figure 2: Circuit 2 - Three Series Resistances 4. Build Circuit 2 by adding an 8.2k resistor in series with Circuit 1. Record the total resistance of this new circuit....
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course CS 135 taught by Professor Gewali during the Spring '08 term at University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

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02_Basic_DC_1 - University of Nevada, Reno Electrical &...

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