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UE Reflection paper 2

UE Reflection paper 2 - 1 Urban Education Reflection#2 is a...

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1 Urban Education Reflection #2 is a white middle-class third-year undergraduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. The fieldwork site is an urban public school with a high concentration of African American children in . The third-grade students of rooms 407 and 401 begin the morning sitting on a large map- of-the-united-states rug in room 407. Teacher Joe and Teacher Sarah sit in the front of the room, often both talking at once, and direct small groups of children to put their bags and coats on the row of hooks in the back of the classroom and hand in their homework. A line forms in front of Teacher Sarah and moves slowly; in addition to handing Teacher Sarah homework sheets, each child receives a handshake or hug from her. Then each child sits at a desk and writes quietly in his or her journal or practices SSR (Sustained Silent Reading). During this morning time, the room is kept relatively quiet – something difficult to achieve in a room of over forty children aged nine or ten. Teacher Joe and Teacher Sarah exercise tight and effective discipline on the two combined classes of children, but not (as is the wont of many teachers), as harsh authoritarian figures; rather, Teacher Joe and Teacher Sarah act as parental figures. Compared to more impersonal brief disciplinary encounters children have with some of the other teachers they interact with, Teacher Joe and Teacher Sarah have more positive and compassionate ways of addressing behavior that add to and come out of the personal relationships each teacher has with each child. Three teacher-student interactions demonstrate how Teacher Joe and Teacher Sarah, as the two main teachers of the third- graders, prevent many escalations in student-teacher conflict through their patience and love for their students.
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