PHY 361 test - Alex Ceballos Dr.Cole 4/21/11 PHY 361 TEST...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Alex Ceballos Dr.Cole 4/21/11 PHY 361 TEST #2 1. The book states in pg. 200 that the slope of the wavefunction must be continuous wherever U(x) has a finite value. Since at x=0 and x=L the potential U(x) equals infinity, also known as a non-finite value, the discontinuity of the slope of the wavefunction does not violate the requirement imposed on the WF. 2. (This is addressing Q3) [p] is fuzzy not because it’s changing in magnitude in time, but because the sign flips from positive to negative as the particle bounces off the potential walls over and over again. By squaring the momentum operator, we get rid of the sign changing and hence obtain an eigenvalue for our eigenfunction. Thus [p 2 ] is sharp. 3. (This is addressing Q4) No, the normalization coefficient remains the same. We must remember that physically speaking the system is still the same as before, the overall length, or width of the box remains L. So when we impose the normalization condition, the second term of the integrand, the cos(2x) contributes nothing to the integral, so all you get is just 1, evaluated from [-L/2, L/2], which turns out to be the same as evaluating it in the interval [0,L] because of the symmetry of our system, and again, because the particle doesn’t give a damn where we set our origin, the normalization coefficient is still the same. 4. (This is addressing Q5) The uncertainty principle determines that you can only know one component of angular momentum, and the total magnitude, not the direction. The reason is that if you knew the direction of L , then the particle would be bound to an orbital plane
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course PHYSICS 361 taught by Professor Cole during the Spring '11 term at N. Arizona.

Page1 / 3

PHY 361 test - Alex Ceballos Dr.Cole 4/21/11 PHY 361 TEST...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online