COMD 2050 CHAPTER 4

COMD 2050 CHAPTER 4 - COMD 2050 9/7/11 Ch. 4 Sound patterns...

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COMD 2050 9/7/11 Ch. 4 Sound patterns of language Yule, G. (2010). The Study of Language (4th ed.). New York:
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Phonology The study of the sound system of a language Description of the systems and patterns of speech sounds in a language. Based on a theory of what a native speaker unconsciously knows about the sound patterns of his/her language. We use our phonological knowledge to decipher meaning even when spelling or sounds are not exactly like the original.
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Listen to the story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ibn_lgfiwg
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How do you know what the speaker is saying?
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PHONOLOGY! You have representations of speech sounds of your language “in your mind.” These “abstract units” are called phonemes. Phonemes are basic units of speech. So even if the sounds are pronounced a bit differently, we still generally recognize them as “matching” the phoneme representation in our mind.
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Underlying “blueprint” of each sound that we have, rather than how it’s articulated. Example: [t] in t ar, st ar, writ er. In our mind, they’re all the same (a “t” sound), but they are actually articulated (phonetically) different. [t] ≠ [t] ???
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Even it [t] is actually articulated differently WHO CARES?!!
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True, the phonetic differences are not as important to us as those that exist between sounds like [t] and [k]. These differences will change word meanings Example: bat [bæt] is meaningfully different from back [bæk] We know that [t] and [k] are different phonemes because of the contrastive property – a change in one phoneme
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Phonemes are characterized by their features : voice, place, and manner. [bæt] and [bæd] differ by one phoneme,
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course COMD 2050 taught by Professor Collins during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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COMD 2050 CHAPTER 4 - COMD 2050 9/7/11 Ch. 4 Sound patterns...

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