WK6Water Resource Plan

WK6Water Resource Plan - Running head: WATER RESOURCE PLAN...

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Running head: WATER RESOURCE PLAN 1 Water Resource Plan Angel Bingham SCI/275 January 15, 2012 Anwar Johnson
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WATER RESOURCE PLAN 2 Water Resource Plan Pollution is commonly defined as an “undesirable state of the natural environment being contaminated with harmful substances as a consequence of human activities” (The Free Dictionary, 2012). Water pollution is the undesirable state existing in places such as lakes, oceans, rivers, and streams. In an effort to properly grasp the hazards of water pollution, people need to realize the amount of water consumption that exists in daily activities. In 2000 it was estimated that 408 billion gallons of water was used a day (Hutson, Barber, Kenny, Linsey, Lumia, & Maupin, 2005). Most of the consumption came from thermoelectric power and irrigation. This estimation is now 12 years old. It is a considerably safe assumption that the daily water consumption of the world today has increased significantly because of population growth. Therefore, it is more important than ever to sustain the world’s water supply. There are three classes used to identify water pollutants. Disease-causing agents entering untreated waste and sewage system are listed under the first class. Examples of these pollutants would be viruses and bacteria. Oxygen-demanding wastes are wastes decomposed by bacteria. These wastes require oxygen and are found within the second class. The waters oxygen levels are exhausted throughout this process, and this causes other organisms to die. Inorganic pollutants such as toxic metals and salts are water-soluble, and exist within the third class of water pollutants. Various forms of human activity generate water pollution. The two classes of water pollution source are point and non-point. Pollutants unable to be traced to an exact location are considered non-point sources. Some examples of these sources are air pollutants that come in
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WATER RESOURCE PLAN 3 through groundwater and acid(Lenntech, 2011). Pollutants discharged from specific locations such as pipelines and sewers are known as point sources. Not only does water pollution affect the water supply, but also results in various other
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WK6Water Resource Plan - Running head: WATER RESOURCE PLAN...

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