introduction chapter of CNW Lecture

introduction chapter of CNW Lecture - Computer Networks...

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CPSC 441: 1-1 Computer Networks Computer Networks Instructor: Dr. Udaya Kumar Susarla Office: Administrative Block Weekly Lecture Schedule: Mon 3-4, Tue 2-3, Fri 3-4 Class Room: 2409 Lecture Slides will be made available on the College Web site Assignments must be submitted for every unit Lab reports must be submitted immediately following the week experiment is conducted TEXT BOOKS: 1. Computer Networks — Andrew S Tanenbaum, 4th Edition. Pearson Education/PHI 2. Data Communications and Networking – Behrouz A. Forouzan. Third Edition TMH. 3. Data and Computer Communications William Stallings. Pearson Education/PHI
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CPSC 441: 1-2 Introduction and Overview of the Course Introduction and Overview of the Course Introduction Dominating technologies in the past three centuries:  The 18 th  century: The time of the great mechanical systems accompanying the Industrial  Revolution.  The 19 th  century: the age of the steam engine.  The  20 th  century:  the  key  technology  has  been  information  gathering,  processing,  and  distribution. e.g., telephone, radio, TV, computer, and satellites.  The 21 st  Century: Wireless, nano technology, bio-technology, ??????????????? Introduction
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CPSC 441: 1-3 The Trends   The  differences  between  collecting,  transporting,  storing,  and  processing  information  are  quickly disappearing.  The  merging  of  computers  and  communications  has  had  a  profound  influence  on  the  way  computer systems are organized.  The concept of the “computer center” is rapidly being replaced by one in which a large number  of  separate  but  interconnected  computers  do  the  job.  These  systems  are  called  computer  networks.  The  term  of  “computer  network”  means  an  interconnected  collection  of  autonomous  computers.  Two computers are said to be interconnected if they are able to exchange information.  The  requirement  for  computers  to  be  autonomous  excludes  from  our  definition  systems  in  which there is a clear master/slave relation.  Introduction
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CPSC 441: 1-4 The key difference between a computer network and a  distributed system In  a  distributed  system,  the  existence  of  multiple  autonomous  computers  is  transparent to the user. A distributed system looks like a virtual uniprocessor to its  users.  With a network, a user must explicitly do the followings: log onto one machine (e.g.,  rlogin), submit jobs remotely (e.g.,  rsh), move files around (e.g.,  rcp, ftp, uucp), and  generally handle all the network management personally.  In effect, a distributed system is a special case of a network, one whose software gives it a high  degree of cohesiveness and transparency.  Introduction
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introduction chapter of CNW Lecture - Computer Networks...

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