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Types_of_Corrective_Feedback

Types_of_Corrective_Feedback - TYPES OF CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK...

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Unformatted text preview: TYPES OF CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK Explicit correction: The teacher clearly points out the student’s error and provides the correct form. S: The dog run fastly. T: ‘Fastly’ doesn’t exist. ‘Fast’ does not take w1y. That’s why I picked ‘quickiy’. Recasts: The teacher reformulates all or part of the students’ utterance, minus the error. Recasts are not introduced by ‘You mean’ or ‘You should say’; therefore, they are implicit. S 1: Why you don’t like Marc? T: Why don’t you iike Mare? 32: I don’t know, E don’t like him. Elicitation: The teacher uses one of three techniques to elicit the correct form from students: the teacher elicits completion of a student’s utterance, uses a question to eiicit correct forms, or asks students to reformulate their utterance. S: My father cieans the plate. T: Excuse me, he cieans the i??? S: Plate? Repetition: The teacher repeats the error usually with rising intonation to highlight the error. 8: He’s in the bathroom. T: Bathroom? Metalinguistic: The teacher provides comments, information, or questions related to the correctness of the student’s . ' utterance without explicitly providing the correct form. ' ' S: We iook at the people yesterday. T: What’s the ending we put on verbs when we talk about the past? S: e-d Clarification: The teacher repeats the error or says a phrase such as ‘Pardon me?’ to indicate that the student has been misunderstood by the teacher and a repetition is needed or the utterance is incorrect and a reformuiation is needed. T: How often do you wash the dishes? S: Fourteen. T: Excuse me. (Clarification request) S: Fourteen. T: Fourteen what? (Clarification request) 8: Fourteen for a week. Reprinted from: Lightbown, RM. & Spade, N. (2006). How Languages are Learned, 3rd Edition. Oxford: Oxford Press. pp. 125 m 327. ...
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