CAUSATIVE VERBS.ppt(lesson) - CAUSATIVE VERBS In English,...

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CAUSATIVE VERBS
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In English, causative verbs are things that: allow someone to do something Ex: Judy let me walk her dog. • force someone to do something Ex: My mother made me clean my room • or to convince someone to do something Ex: The doctor got the patient to take the vaccine. Some causative verbs are Let / make / have / get … Let : [let + sb + verb] = "to allow someone to do sth“ Ex: John let me drive his new car. Will your parents let you go to the party? I don't know if my boss will let me take the day off. Make [make + sb + verb]= "to force sb to do sth" Ex: • My teacher made me apologize for what I had said. • Did somebody make you wear that ugly hat? • She made her children do their homework. Have [Subject + have + sb + verb] = "to give sb the responsibility to do sth" Ex: Dr. Smith had his nurse take the patient's temperature. Please have your secretary fax me the information. I had the mechanic check the brakes.
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Have [Subject + have + O + Past Participle] Ex: I had my hair cut last Saturday. She had the car washed at the weekend. Get [get + sb+ to + verb] = "to convince to do sth" or "to trick sb into doing sth“ Ex: Susie got her son to take the medicine even though it tasted terrible. How can parents get their children to read more? The government TV commercials are trying to get people to stop smoking. Get vs. Have = "get sb to do sth" is interchangeable with "have sb do sth," but these expressions do not mean exactly the same thing. Ex: I got the mechanic to check my brakes. At first the mechanic didn't think it was necessary, but I convinced him to check the brakes. I had the mechanic check my brakes. I asked the mechanic to check the brakes. Exercises + Practice 120
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CONDITIONAL SENTENCES (if clauses) The conditional sentences are sometimes confusing for learners of English. • Watch out: 1) Which type of the conditional sentences is used? 2) Where is the if-clause (e.g. at the beginning or at the end of the conditional sentence)? There are three types of the if-clauses. Type1 • If clause (present simple), + main clause (will / can) + verb • a real condition / a probable condition in the present or future. Ex: If I have time, I will g o to the concert tonight. • I always take an umbrella if it rains . If the weather is nice next week, we will go on a picnic.
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Type 2 • If clause (past simple), + main clause (would / could) + verb • an unreal condition / an probable condition / or an imaginary situation in the present or future. Ex: I would buy a house if I had enough money. (this is unreal because it isn’t true now. The truth is that I don’t have enough money so I won’t buy a house.) • If Mary lived in this city, I would see her every week. (this sentence is unreal because
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CAUSATIVE VERBS.ppt(lesson) - CAUSATIVE VERBS In English,...

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