class notes 4 - Genre specific features Textual features...

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Genre specific features Textual features specific to the genre (or discipline) and often defining of it Modes of argumentation / structure of texts Norms Grammatical / syntactic structures e.g. Shall/will in English legal texts (obligation/matter of fact) Problems for a translator Different SL and TL norms for text creation in a specific discipline and genre What do you do? Parallel texts are an essential resource Absence of specific structures in TL Recognition of structures in SL as meaningful in themselves Useful to read up on how you are supposed to write in those disciplines Both terminology and specific structures exist to reduce ambiguity They make it clear to a specialist reader what is meant – normally one thing only However, for a non-specialist this can cause problems as they have to learn how to read as a specialist Conclusion Specialist translation involves the translation of specialised language Specialised language aims for clarity for its specialised audience
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course SMLM 142 taught by Professor Olgacastro/xuzhuangli during the Spring '11 term at University of Exeter.

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class notes 4 - Genre specific features Textual features...

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