14991 - Informing health professionals, protecting patients...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Informing health professionals, protecting patients Richard Smith Editor, BMJ Lagos 2001
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What I want to talk about The usefulness of information Methods for informing professionals How are we doing? How could we do better? Are patients getting the best treatments? Are they safe? How do we protect patients? How could we do better?
Background image of page 2
Utility of information Utility=relevance x validity x interactivity work to access
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Source Relevance Validity Ease of Access Utility Journal Low Moderate Moderate Low to moderate Textbook High Moderate/ low Moderate Moderate Colleague High Moderate/ low High High/mod erate Cochrane Library Low High Low Moderate Clinical Evidence High High High High
Background image of page 4
Current problems with informing professionals A picture that captures in one image how doctors feel about information
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Current problems with information supply Our current information policy resembles the worst aspects of our old agricultural policy, which left grain rotting in thousands of storage files while people were starving. We have warehouses of unused information rotting while critical questions are left unanswered and critical problems are left unresolved. Al Gore
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Current problems On my desk I have accumulated journals and books as information sources, and I assume that I use them. But in some respects they are not as useful as they might be. Many of my textbooks are out of date; I would like to purchase new ones, but they are expensive. My journals are not organised so that I can quickly find answers to questions that arise, and so I don = t have print sources that will answer some questions. On the other hand, there is likely to be a human source who can answer nearly all of the questions that arise, albeit with another set of barriers. An ordinary doctor
Background image of page 8
Current problems Think of all the information that you might read to help you do your job better. How much of it do you read?
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 Less than 1% 1%-10% 11%- 50% 51%- 90% More than 90% Amount read Percentage Series2 Series1
Background image of page 10
Current problems Do you feel guilty about how much or how little you read?
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Do you feel guilty about how much or little you read? Yes No
Background image of page 12
Words used by 41 doctors to describe their information supply Impossible Impossible Impossible Impossible Impossible Impossible Overwhelming Overwhelming Overwhelming Overwhelming Overwhelming Overwhelming Difficult Difficult Difficult Difficult Daunting Daunting Daunting Pissed off Choked Depressed Despairing Worrisome Saturation Vast Help Exhausted Frustrated Time consuming Dreadful Awesome Struggle Mindboggling Unrealistic Stress Challenging Challenging Challenging Excited Vital importance
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
information needs during consultations Information needs do arise regularly when doctors see patients (about two questions per consultation) Questions are most likely
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course PHARM 290 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 58

14991 - Informing health professionals, protecting patients...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online