from kindergarten to the boardroom The Top Priorities

from kindergarten to the boardroom The Top Priorities -...

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APRIL 11, 2011 From Kindergarten to the Boardroom: The Top Priorities Women face unique challenges at specific stages of their careers. Task-force participants at The Wall Street Journal's Women in the Economy Conference split off into six career-stage sessions, and came up with four priorities each for dealing with each phase of the career life cycle for women. Here's a look at those priorities—and edited excerpts of the presentations by the co-chairs of each session. EDUCATION Top Four Recommendations 1. TEACH GENDER EQUITY AND LEADERSHIP: Provide training on gender bias to parents and instructors, draft a curriculum and teach students about gender equity alongside other social issues. Work to ease transitions in the education process at key drop-off points for girls. Start early teaching of leadership skills in schools, along with related topics such as networking and negotiations. Re-evaluate the core curriculum in all subjects to focus on gender equality and leadership. 2. SEX UP SCIENCE, TECH, ENGINEERING AND MATH: Make introductory science, technology, engineering and math courses more engaging. Improve the public portrayal of women scientists and engineers and highlight the rewards of these careers. Bring women scientists into schools as role models. Start all of this in middle school and then work to keep girls engaged. 3. REVISE TEACHER PAY AND TENURE: Rethink how we select, train, reward and retain teachers. Consider pay differentials for science, technology, engineering and math teachers; create a "fast track" for professionals in these areas who may want to change careers and become teachers. Recruit teachers from the top third of their graduating classes and increase average pay. Tie teacher compensation and tenure to performance. 4. STRENGTHEN SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY: Focus on recruiting qualified school superintendents, principals and faculty, then train and empower them to improve teaching across grades. We should have national metrics for measuring the success or failure of schools and create a standardized data dashboard to evaluate performance. AMY GUTMANN: Here's the good news: Girls do really well in school. And here is the not-so-good news: There is a huge amount of gender inequity and lack of leadership training for girls in our schools. We need throughout our school systems to provide training on gender bias to parents and instructors, draft curricula and teach students about gender equity alongside other issues. We need to couple the teaching of gender equity to something enormously positive and important for our young girls and boys alike: the teaching of leadership skills, which include skills in negotiation and networking. NOREAN R. SHARPE: We would like to make introductory science, technology and engineering courses more engaging for all students. We should highlight rewards of these careers, as well as alternative career paths. Bring women scientists into schools as role models, and make the point that this should be
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course CSR 309 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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from kindergarten to the boardroom The Top Priorities -...

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