Government Agency Contact Center Improvements & Budget Constraints

Government Agency Contact Center Improvements & Budget Constraints

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The New Government Agency Contact Center: Blending Phone, Email, Web and Chat to Expand and Improve Services within Existing Budget Constraints Greg Gianforte, CEO and Founder, RightNow Technologies © 2005 RightNow Technologies, Inc.
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2005 RightNow Technologies, Inc. Table of Contents Executive Summary 1 The Problem with “Stovepipe” Communications 2 The “I explained this in my email” syndrome 2 The “That’s not what it said on your web site!” syndrome 3 The endless repetitive phone calls syndrome 3 The New Agency Contact Center 5 Common Case Management 5 Common Knowledge Base Authoring and Access 8 Five Reasons Why Every Agency Needs a Multi-Channel Contact Center Strategy 11 About the Author 13 About RightNow 13
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2005 RightNow Technologies, Inc. 1 Executive summary People communicate with government agencies in many ways. They call. They send email. They visit a web site. That’s why agencies try to make each communication channel as effective as possible. But it has become critical to manage these channels in a more integrated way. That’s because people now use phone, email and the web interchangeably. They send emails about problems they already discussed with someone by phone. They visit web sites to double-check information they received via email. To meet the needs of their channel-hopping constituencies, agencies must therefore manage communication across all channels in a common manner. There are basically two requirements for integrating phone and online communication channels: 1) Applying common case management across all channels 2) Applying a common knowledge base across all channels The impact of this integrated approach is substantial. Cross-channel contact centers enable agencies to provide more responsive service, support more programs, and deliver consistently accurate information—within existing resource constraints . That’s because an integrated approach makes each channel become more efficient and, over time, drives more and more interactions to most efficient and scalable channel: the web. Cross-channel contact centers also provide agencies with greater visibility into the top concerns of their constituencies—whether those constituencies are citizens, businesses, other agencies or internal staff. This visibility enables them to more proactively address these concerns, resulting in both service improvements and a reduced volume of incoming inquiries. Agencies that fail to adopt this integrated approach suffer. It will be harder for them to handle their growing communication workloads. The information they provide will be inconsistent from channel to channel. Front-line staff will have to spend time repeatedly answering the same redundant questions over and over. And more expert staff members will continually get pulled away from their primary responsibilities to help out when more difficult questions are asked. Fortunately, it’s not difficult to implement an integrated cross-channel
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Government Agency Contact Center Improvements & Budget Constraints

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