prediciting intent to use

prediciting intent to use - The easiest, simplest, most...

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The easiest, simplest, most direct guide to understanding consumer acceptance of the “Smart Grid” Richard Feinberg Department of Consumer Sciences and Retailing The Energy Center- Discovery Park Purdue University May 20, 2009
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You make electricity. You meter the electricity. You send the consumers’ a bill 30 days later and say pay up (they usually do). Sometimes (not often) you say thank you (not often). Utilities create and deliver electrons. Up to right now that really has been enough. But the Smart Grid (SG) is saying to the consumer it is important that you make decisions about these electrons. First, consumers don’t have a clue what an electron is and how it is produced. Ask a consumer how this all happens and they have as much understanding (generally speaking) of how this is done as they do how the car works. Up to right now that has been fine. Consumers get into the car and turn the key and go. All we ask of customers is that they pay their bill. (Sometimes we ask them to tie up the dog so that our meter reader is safe). The customer does not have to do anything. The customer has not had to do anything. They take their plug, they put it in, and the stuff just works. They get the bill, look at the bill, get totally confused by the bill but pay it anyway because the stuff works when they plug it in. We don’t ask much of the customer. Everyone is happy. Now you are about to embark with a system whose potential (full potential really) will only be realized if and when consumers’ embrace it. The problem is the Smart Grid (SG) is designed by engineers, generally for engineers , and the consumer appears to be an afterthought. If you expect, all of a sudden, that consumers are going to be overjoyed with the Smart Grid you probably believe that everyone can do calculus. The success of the SG depends in part on consumers allowing the Utility to do things that consumers have never really let utilities do, asked them to do, even want them to do. The utility will be telling consumers to make decisions they have never had to make, to evaluate information they have never had to evaluate, to buy or allow devices in the 2
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home that are intrusive, to buy new types of appliances that will allow these decisions to have an impact: This from an industry that creates bills that defy understanding from even people who work at the utility. Consumers do not trust utilities. Now we are saying TRUST us we want to help you. We want to put things in your home that will help you. And as you are saying this the consumer is saying…WHAT you want to control my life even more. The consumer knows (in their heart of hearts) that when you say we will help you what you really mean is that your bill will go up.
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2012 for the course CSR 309 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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prediciting intent to use - The easiest, simplest, most...

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