Group 2 Large Trees-1-2010

Group 2 Large Trees-1-2010 - Betula nigra River Birch...

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Unformatted text preview: Betula nigra River Birch Betulaceae Native to: E US (z3) Adaptability: Very adapted to wet sites; Avoid dry or high pH soil Use: Upright open habit, 40-70 Best as multi-stemmed specimen Yellow fall foliage color Significant Features: Reddish-brown exfoliating bark Flowers- male catkins 2-3 long Leaves- rhombic-ovate and doubly serrated Betula nigra River Birch Betulaceae Heritage Glossy leaves White/salmo n-white bark Betula nigra River Birch Betulaceae Fox Valley reaches 10 after 15-20 yrs Catalpa speciosa Northern Catalpa Bignoniaceae (z4) Native - Eastern US Short-lived (50 yrs is old) Very site tolerant, even alkaline soils The bold, striking form gives the tree considerable winter interest Flowers are 4-8 panicles; 8-20 pods persist into winter Very coarse, too coarse for many landscapes; yet still striking architecture in winter Cercidiphyllum japonicum Katsuratree Cercidiphyllaceae Native to: Japan (z4), Adaptability: Not drought tolerant early (water well initially) Tolerant of site conditions once established Use: 40-60 upright multiple trunks unless pruned Significant Features: Blue-green, orbiculate foliage Gray bark becoming shaggy Apricot fall foliage (yellow-red) Pendula 15-20 Like cascading water cascading Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis Common Honeylocust Fabaceae Native to: Central US (z4) Adaptability: Mimosa webworm Locust mites Tolerates alkaline soils (urban soils) Salt tolerant Uses: Street tree Vase-shaped replacement for American elms. Significant Features: Red-Brown mature fruit pod Foliage: dappled, filtered, light...
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course HORT 217 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Group 2 Large Trees-1-2010 - Betula nigra River Birch...

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