Lecture Notes7

Lecture Notes7 - Family Caprifoliaceae(Linnaeaceae Native...

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1 Family – Caprifoliaceae (Linnaeaceae) Abelia x grandiflora Native Region – Hybrid origin: Glossy Abelia Abelia chinensis x A. uniflora USDA Hardiness Zone – 5 (herbaceous perennial in zone 5) Function Height Spread Border, foundation, massing, bank cover 3-6’ 3-6’ Growth Rate Texture Form and Habit Moderate Medium-fine Spreading, dense, rounded, multi-stemmed with arching branches. Foremost Landscape Interests by Seasons Spring Foliage is semi-evergreen in Indiana, sometimes persisting in warm winters Summer Many white, pink-flushed terminal flower panicles all summer Autumn Winter Leaves persist or turn bronze-purple before falling. Site Requirements and Special Features Prefers slightly acid, moist, well-drained soil. Limitations Can develop chlorosis on high pH soils. Yearly pruning required to remove deadwood. May become leggy with age if not killed back in winter. Important Variants ‘Francis Mason’—yellow-variegated foliage and overall smaller size. ‘Sherwoodii’—more dense, compact habit. Key Recognition Features Lustrous dark green leaves are opposite, 0.5-1.5” long, with dentate margins. May be bearded near base of midrib beneath. Stems narrow, and young are pubescent and older exfoliate.
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2 Family – Pinaceae (Abietaceae) Abies concolor Native Region – Southwestern U.S. and White Fir adjacent Mexico USDA Hardiness Zone – 4 Function Height Spread Screen, specimen >30-50’ >15-30’ Growth Rate Texture Form and Habit Moderate Medium Regularly pyramidal, dense. Foremost Landscape Interests by Seasons Spring Foliage is evergreen. Needles are more or less bluish, flat and curved. Summer Autumn Winter Site Requirements and Special Features Similar to Picea pungens f. glauca in color and general form, but less positive, and so easier to use in a variety of situations. Better adapted to hot, dry summers than most other firs. Limitations Performs poorly on heavy clay soils. Important Variants ‘Candicans’ - bright silver-blue needles on more narrow upright tree. ‘Conica’- slower growing pyramidal form Key Recognition Features Needles (1.5-2.5” long) point upward along stem as in a hairbrush, have 2 waxy bands on lower surface, and suction cup-like bases. First year stems are yellowish-green and slightly downy, in the second year they turn grayish. Butterscotch colored buds are covered with resin. Elongated cones are 3-6’ long.
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3 Family –Pinaceae (Abietaceae) Abies homolepis Native Region – Japan Nikko Fir USDA Hardiness Zone – 4 Function Height Spread Screen, specimen >30-50’ >15-30’ Growth Rate Texture Form and Habit Moderate Medium Regularly pyramidal, wider and fuller than other firs. Branches to the ground Foremost Landscape Interests by Seasons Spring Foliage is evergreen. Summer Autumn Winter Site Requirements and Special Features Full sun. Prefers moist, well-drained loam soil.
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course HORT 217 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue.

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Lecture Notes7 - Family Caprifoliaceae(Linnaeaceae Native...

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